Logo Picture Left SideLogo Picture Right SideLogo Text at Center
Home > Search > Site Map > Quarry Articles, Links and Books

Quarry- & Stone-Related Articles, Links, Books, Etc.


Next Page >>

(After using the links below, use your “Back” button to return to this site.)

Ash Grove Cement Plant, Seattle, Washington Ash Grove Cement Plant, Seattle, Washington Ash Grove Cement Plant, Seattle, Washington

 

 

 

Picture from "The Freestone Quarries of Pyrmont, Sydney, New South Wales," Australia, "Scientific American Supplement 427, Mar. 8, 1884

Picture from “The Freestone Quarries of Pyrmont, Sydney,
New South Wales
,” Australia, Scientific American Supplement, No. 427, March 8, 1884

Front cover of "The Book of Vermont Marble," 1929 “The William H. Porter Mausoleum, Woodlawn Cemetery, New York, as it looked in the early stages of construction. Trowbridge & Livingston, Architects.” “This recent photo (circa 1929) of the old Custom House, Erie, Pa., shows the excellent condition of the marble after nearly a hundred years of exposure. Edward Summers, Architect.”

Front cover of The Book of Vermont Marble

“The William H. Porter Mausoleum, Woodlawn Cemetery, New York, as it looked in the early stages of construction. Trowbridge & Livingston, Architects.”
(circa 1929)

“This recent photo (circa 1929) of the old Custom House, Erie, Pa., shows the excellent condition of the marble after nearly a hundred years of exposure. Edward Summers, Architect.”

  • “Brown-Stone (The end of an era)” (November 1869) The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 1, Issue 11, November 1869, pgs. 332-333. (Article in digital images viewed at American Memory, Library of Congress.)
  • Brunner and Lay Tool Catalog - Brunner & Lay, Manufacturers of Marble, Stone, Granite and Bricklayers’ Tools, Stone Jacks, Derricks, and Contractors’ Supplies, 570 West Polk Street, Corner Jefferson and Polk Streets, Chicago, Illinois. (No date of publication) (Please Note: Using the link at the beginning of this section will take you a menu from which you can access the individual pages of this catalog. You can also use this Brunner and Lay Tool Catalog PDF link to view the booklet in PDF format.)
  • Building and Ornamental Stones of the United States,” by George P. Merrill, article in Popular Science Monthly, conducted by E. L. and W. J. Youmans, Vol. XXVII, May to October, 1885.
  • Building in War Times” (World War I), in Stone, An Illustrated Magazine, July 1917.
    “Banking Office of Brown Bros. & Co., New York – At Hanover and Beaver Streets. Architects: Delano & Aldrich, New York. Built of Georgia white marble...” ("Stone" magazine, July 1917) “Residence of John Sherman Hoyt, New York – Corner of 79th Street and Park Avenue. Built of stone from Chestnut Hill, Pa. Triming of Buff Indiana limestone...” ("Stone" magazine, July 1917)

    “Banking Office of Brown Bros. & Co., New York – At Hanover and Beaver Streets. Architects: Delano & Aldrich, New York. Built of Georgia white marble...”

    “Residence of John Sherman Hoyt, New York – Corner of 79th Street and Park Avenue. Built of stone from Chestnut Hill, Pa. Trimming of Buff Indiana limestone...”

  • Building Stone of the United States - the NIST Test Wall, presented by the Building and Fire Research Laboratory, sponsored by the National Park Service. (You can visit the NIST Test Wall in Gaithersburg, Maryland.) (The photograph below is used with permission.)
    “The stone test wall was constructed to study the performance of stone subjected to weathering. It contains 2352 individual samples of stone, of which 2032 are domestic stone from 47 states, and 320 are stones from 16 foreign countries....” NIST Test Wall

    (The following description is from the web site.) “The stone test wall was constructed to study the performance of stone subjected to weathering. It contains 2352 individual samples of stone, of which 2032 are domestic stone from 47 states, and 320 are stones from 16 foreign countries. Over 30 distinct types of stones are represented, some of which are not commonly used for building purposes. There are many varieties of the common types used in building, such as marble, limestone, sandstone, and granite. This site presents the existing data and pictures for each particular stone.”

  • “The Building Stones in the United States” (October 1884) The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 16, Issue 10, October 1884, pgs. 229-230. (Article in digital images viewed at American Memory, Library of Congress.)
  • Building Stones of the Northwest” (in 1892) (Minnesota, Northern Wisconsin, & Canadian north shore of Lake Superior), in Stone, An Illustrated Magazine, June 1892
  • California – History of Quarrying in California from the California Indians up to Present Time. Presentation for the International Stonework Symposium 2011 – January 13, 2011. (“History of Quarrying in California from the California Indians up to Present Time” brochure in PDF)
  • “Cape Ann Quarries, Massachusetts” (1884) Also included in this 1884 article from Harper's New Monthly Magazine are several sketches of stone quarriers and stone cutters at work and other quarry-related pictures.
  • Cape Ann, Massachusetts – Leslie D. Barlett’s wonderful quarry photographs were displayed in his “Chapters on a Quarry Wall,” museum installation/photograph collection at the Cape Ann Historical Museum in Gloucester, Massachusetts, in early 2008. Since then he has had other presentations and exhibitions in New York City, Vermont, and Michigan. You’ll find more information about his presentations and installations below.

    Leslie Bartlett’s new book, Break Stone – Water – Heart: The Lives & Struggles of Cape Ann’s Quarry Workers, will be available on Saturday and Sunday, November 2nd & 3rd, for the first book signing at the Lanesville Community Center located at Lanesville Community Center, 8 Vulcan Street, Gloucester, Massachusetts. He has prepared a You Tube video entitled, “Cape Ann Granite.”

    Chapters on a Quarry Wall.” is one of Leslie Bartlett’s past installations.

    Shadowing Ibis Photograph Cape Ann Historical Museum, Gloucester, Massachusetts

    This photograph was a part of the museum installation, and it is titled ‘Shadowing Ibis.’

    Chapters on a Quarry Wall Exhibit by Les Bartlett

    Leslie D. Barlett’s “Chapters on a Quarry Wall”

    Photo Collection New York City, New York
    May 5 - May 30, 2009

    Give Me Your Hands: The Legacy of the Barre Sculptors and Their Stone. A photographic exhibition by Leslie D. Bartlett. October 2 through December 15, 2011, at the Michigan State University College of LawGive Me Your Hands:  The Legacy of the Barre
    Sculptors and Their Stone


    This was one of Leslie D. Bartlett’s past presentations held 
    October 2 through December 15, 2011, at the Michigan State University
    College of Law.


    “Successive waves of master stone sculptors, carvers, and quarrymen came to America during the late 1800s and early 1900s.  This photography exhibition documents their lives, their craft, and the plight of some of the immigrant master stone sculptors who have labored with the granite stone from the quarries of Barre, Vermont....”

  • Carrara, Italy – “Marble quarries of Ravaccione, at Carrara,” Italy, engraving from a late 1800’s magazine.
    “Marble quarries of Ravaccione, at Carrara,” Italy, engraving from a late 1800’s magazine
  • Carrara Marble Quarries in Italy (circa 1854) – “Famous Quarries of the World,” Putnam’s Monthly Magazine of American Literature, Science and Art, Vol. 4, Issue 22, October 1854, pp. 404-408.  (Quarries described in this article include:  The Carrara Marbles Quarries in Italy; the Pentelic and Paros quarries in Greece; the marble quarry at Brandon, Vermont; & the marble quarry at Rutland, Vermont, in the United States.)
  • The Quarries of Carrara,” in Scientific American, Vol. LII, No. 7, New York, February 14, 1885, pp. 103-104.
  • Carrara” (Marble) (PDF), article from The Monumental News, March 1893, pp. 123-125.
    Carrara (Marble), article from The Monumental News, March 1893
  • The Carrara Marble Industry” (Italy), Scientific American Supplement, Vol. LIII, No. 1376, New York, May 17, 1902, pp. 22045-22046.
    The marble city of Carrara & How the quarried marble is carried down ("Scientific American," 1902) Railway leading to the foot of the quarries & Quarries at La Piastra ("Scientific American," 1902)

    The Marble City of Carrara (left above) & How the quarried marble is carried down (right above)

    The Famous Marble Quarries of Carrara: The Railway leading to the foot of the quarries (left above) & Quarries at La Piastra (right above)

  • Carrara Marble Quarries, Italy, “A Marble World,” Pearson’s Magazine, by E. St. John Hart, February 1903
“A Marble World” circa 1903, Carrara, Italy Lower a block from high to low level, Carrara, Italy ca. 1903 A sea of marble, with four blocks on their way down from the quarries, Carrara, Italy ca. 1903

A gigantic block of marble used for the statue of the Austrian Empress in “A Marble World”

“Lower a block from high to low level”

“A sea of marble, with four blocks on their way down from the quarries”

Transferring a block, weighing 40 tons, from the foot of the quarry to Carrara with a team of 40 oxen, Carrara, Italy ca. 1903 Avenza, the port of Carrara, whence the marble blocks are shipped to all parts of the world, Italy ca. 1903

“Transferring a block, weighing 40 tons, from the foot of the quarry to Carrara with a team of 40 oxen”

“Avenza, the port of Carrara, whence the marble blocks are shipped to all parts of the world”

  • Carrara, Italy, Marble Quarries –The Marble Quarries of Carrara,” by Day Allen Willey, in Scientific American, Vol. XCVII, No. 20, New York, November 16, 1907, pp. 353, 361-362.
“Marble Crags at Carrara” (Italy, ca. 1907) “Miners making the electrical connections for blasting a monster block of Carrara marble” (Italy, ca. 1907) “Block marked for cutting”

“Marble Crags at Carrara”

“Miners making the electrical connections for blasting a monster block of Carrara marble”

“Block marked for cutting”

“White Marble Quarry Entrance” “Where Carrara sculptors learn their art”  (Carrara, Italy, ca. 1907) “Making the gigantic statues”  (Carrara, Italy, ca. 1907)

“White Marble Quarry Entrance”

“Where Carrara sculptors learn their art”

“Making the gigantic statues”

“Slab cutting saws operated by steam and water power”   (Italy, ca. 1907) “Steam power marble planers”  (Italy, ca. 1907)

“Slab cutting saws operated by steam and water power”

“Steam power marble planers”

Front cover of A Plant and Its Product, published by the Drew Daniels Granite Co., Waterbury, Vermont ( circa 1910) The Drew Daniels Granite Co. Shed No. 2, Waterbury, Vermont (circa 1910) The Heald cemetery memorial design in A Plant and Its Product, published by the Drew Daniels Granite Co., Waterbury, Vt. ( circa 1910)

Front cover of A Plant and Its Product, published by the Drew Daniels Granite Co., Waterbury, Vermont ( circa 1910)

The Drew Daniels Granite Co. Shed No. 2, Waterbury, Vermont (circa 1910)

The Heald cemetery memorial design in A Plant and Its Product, published by the Drew Daniels Granite Co., Waterbury, Vt. ( circa 1910)

Front cover of the F. C. Eaton, Barre, Vermont, monumental catalog Inside front cover listing the companies whose monuments are included in this catalog

Front cover of the F. C. Eaton, Barre, Vermont, monumental catalog

Inside front cover listing the companies whose monuments are included in this catalog

 
Page from F. C. Eaton, Barre, VT, monumental catalog (early 1900s) Page from F. C. Eaton, Barre, VT, monumental catalog (early 1900s) Page from F. C. Eaton, Barre, VT, monumental catalog (early 1900s)

 

Three examples of the monuments presented in the F. C. Eaton, Barre, Vermont, monumental catalog

 

“A fifty ton crane operating in the Lerouville Quarries.” (France), Scientific American Supplement, August 12, 1893, pp. 14681

“A fifty ton crane operating in the Lerouville Quarries.” (France)

"Fig. 1. General View of the Automatic Aerial Cable on Mt. Jalla," in "The Cements of the Gate of France," "Scientific American Supplement," Nov. 28, 1885 "Fig 9. Automatic Aerial Cable - Shipping Station," in "The Cements of the Gate of France," "Scientific American Supplement," Nov. 28, 1885 "Fig. 19. Automatic Aerial Cable - Receiving Station," in "The Cements of the Gate of France," "Scientific American Supplement," Nov. 28, 1885

“Fig. 1. General View of the Automatic Aerial Cable on Mt. Jalla,” in “The Cements of the Gate of France,” Scientific American Supplement, Nov. 28, 1885

“Fig 9. Automatic Aerial Cable - Shipping Station”

“Fig. 19. Automatic Aerial Cable - Receiving Station”

"Special Granite Designs in the Famous Pride of Elberton Granite, Design Book No. 16" (front cover- Georgia) One of the monuments in the "Special Granite Designs in the Famous Pride of Elberton Granite, Design Book No. 16" monument catalog - Georgia Price List for Special Granite Designs, No. 16-H (front cover - Georgia)

Special Granite Designs in the Famous Pride of Elberton Granite, Design Book No. 16 (front cover)

One of the monuments in the Special Granite Designs in the Famous Pride of Elberton Granite, Design Book No. 16 monument catalog

Price List for Special Granite Designs, No. 16-H (front cover)

Frong cover of Georgia Beauties Catalog No. Twenty-Two Georgia Beauties Catalog No. Twenty-Two Page 2 Georgia Beauties Catalog No. Twenty-Two Page 40

Frong cover of Georgia Beauties Catalog No. Twenty-Two

The Amtry cemetery stone of Georgia Marble (p. 2)

Georgia Marble Finishing Works, Canton, Georgia

Harrison Granite Co. Clientele & Monument Catalog Covers ca. 1918 Title page of the Harrison Granite Co. Clientele & Monument Catalog, circa 1918 Letter from Harrison Granite Co. to a customer in June 1921

Harrison Granite Co. Clientele & Monument Catalog Covers

Title page of the Harrison Granite Co. Clientele & Monument Catalog

Letter from Harrison Granite Co. to a customer in June 1921

"Fig. 5. Application of Gay's Stone Saw in a Marble Quarry” (in Belgium) in "The Helicoidal or Wire Stone Saw,"(1885 "Scientific American Supplement No. 520) "Figs 1, 2, and 3. Apparatus for Sawing Stone" (1885 "Scientific American Supplement No. 520) "Fig. 4. Apparatus for Sawing Stone into Slabs" (1885 "Scientific American Supplement No. 520)

“Fig. 5.  Application of Gay’s Stone Saw in a Marble Quarry”
(in Belgium)

“Figs 1, 2, and 3. Apparatus for Sawing Stone”

“Fig. 4. Apparatus for Sawing Stone into Slabs”

  • History of Cemetery Memorial Art,” (PDF) Summary of an address before the National Retail Monument Dealer’s convention at Milwaukee, by S. B. Duffield, in The Monumental News Magazine, early 1900’s, pp. 479-482. (Illustrations include: French’s Melvin Memorial, Concord, Massachusetts; Tomb of Tuleman; Alexander’s Tomb; Tomb of Mausolus; Scipio Sarcophagus; Choragic Monument to Lysicrates; Celtic Cross at Monasterboice, Ireland; Tomb of Theodoric; Petria, City of the Dead; Catacombs of Rome; Column of Trajan; Arch of Titus; Pyramids and Sphinx; Oblisks of Egypt; a 1500-ton stone at Baalbec in quarry; and Temple of Baalbec.)
  • History of the Slate Industry (PDF), excerpt from Hower’s Lightning Slate Reckoner on 33 Practical Sizes Roofing Slate, by F. M. Hower, Proprietor of the Peach Hill Slate Quarry and President of the Eagle Slate Company, Cherryville, Pennsylvania, 1884.
  • Hower’s Lightning Slate Reckoner on 33 Practical Sizes Roofing Slate (1888/1904) (PDF), being a complete and most convenient system of computing the amount in “squares” of any given number of slate…a very convenient ratio on each of the thirty-three different sizes for each two, three and four inches lap, mapping ninety-nine different ratios, together with rules and practical information, To Quarrymen, Operators on Slate, Slate-roofers and others, by F. M. Hower, Proprietor of the Peach Hill Slate Quarry and President of the Eagle Slate Company, Cherryville, Pennsylvania, 1884, 99 pp. (For an interesting comparison, visit Terry Hughes’ “Penrhyn Quarries Slate Calculator,” described on his web site as: “This calculator was produced by Penrhyn Quarries (McAlpine Slate Ltd.) in 1986, just before desk top computers became commonplace. It is one stage in the development of roof design tools from books to spreadsheets.”)
    Contents of this book include: “History of the Slate Industry,” “As to Cost of Maintenance and Repairs,” “How Slate are Put On,” “How to Measure a Roof,” “Punching,” “Slate as Siding,” “Weight of Slate,” “Slate” (dimensions), “Table of Ratios,” “How to Use the Tables,” and “Number of Squares in a plane Roof.” "Hower's Lightning Slate Reckoner (1884-1904), F.M. Hower, Prop. Peach Hill Slate Quarry & Pres. Eagle Slate Co., Cherryville, Pennsylvania
  • Hummelstown Brownstone Company, Waltonville, Pennsylvania – published inthe early 1900s
    The following is a list of the photo captions included in this booklet.  (There are several other unnamed photos in addition to a map of the area.) (pp. 8) “Berst House”; (pp. 9 & 10) “General View Quarry No. 4 looking west”; (pp. 16) “North American Building, Philadelphia, Pa.”; (pp. 17)  “The Market and Fulton National Bank, New York City"; (pp. 18) “Salem Lutheran Church, Lebanon, Pa.”; “Roman Catholic Protectory, Flatland, Pa.”; “Administration Building, State Hospital, Harrisburg, Pa.”; “Pennsylvania College Building, Gettysburg, Pa.”; (pp. 19)  “High School, Altoona, Pa.”; (pp. 20)  “York Collegiate Institute, York, Pa.”; “Bullitt Building, Philadelphia, Pa.”; (pp. 21)  “City Hall, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.”; “Engine House, Philadelphia, Pa.”; (pp. 22)  “Presbyterian Church, Indiana, Pa.”; (pp. 23)  “Emory Methodist Episcopal Church, Pittsburgh, Pa.”; (pp. 24 & 25)  “General View of Mill and Shops from north side of No. 3 Quarry”; (pp. 26)  “Third United Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pa.”; (pp. 27)  “Library, Mount Holly Springs, Pa.” “Residence, Dayton, Ohio”; “United States Post Office, Pottsville, Pa.”; (pp. 28) “Orange County Court-House, Orlando, Florida”; (pp. 29)  “Zion Lutheran Church, Hummelstown, Pa.”; “Christ’s Lutheran Church, Lewisburg, Pa.”; (pp. 30)  “Home Savings Bank, Washington, D.C.”; “Pottier & Stymus, New York City”; “A. A. Scottish Rite, Williamsport, Pa.”; (pp. 31)  “First National Bank, Frackville, Pa.”; “Residence, Washington, D.C.”; (pp. 32)  “Harrisburg Academy, Harrisburg, Pa.”; (pp. 33)  “Rev. B. F. Stevens Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church, Harrisburg, Pa.”; (pp. 34)  “Denny Hall, Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa.”; (pp. 35)  “The Arcade, Cleveland, Ohio”; “Susquehanna Trust Company, Williamsport, Pa.”; (pp. 36)  “Union Station, Indianapolis, Indiana”; (pp. 37)  “National Exchange Bank, Baltimore, Md.”; “Bank entrance detail”; (pp. 38 & 39)  “General View, Rear of Mill”; (pp. 40)  “Residence detail, Philadelphia, Pa.”;  “Bank entrance detail, Philadelphia, Pa.”; (pp. 41)  “Bank entrance detail, New York City”; “College entrance detail, Philadelphia, Pa.”; (pp. 42)  “Stevens High School, Lancaster, Pa.”; (pp. 43)  “Residence, Broad Street, Philadelphia, Pa.”;  “The Citizens Trust Company, Gettysburg, Pa.”)
  • Hummelstown Brownstone: A study of the Hummelstown brownstone industry and its contribution to the American building arts (South of the borough of Hummelstown, Dauphine County, Pennsylvania), by Ben F. Olena.
    Postcard Showing Derricks at Corner of Quarry #4 Asbury United Methodist Church, Uniontown

    Postcard Showing Derricks at Corner of Quarry #4 at Brownstone Quarry

    Asbury United Methodist Church, Uniontown

  • Huntington Botanical Garden Photo Tour – Stones Used in the Garden and Buildings, in San Marino near Pasadena, California, late September, 2010.
  • “In The Marble Hills” (in Vermont) (1890) This article about marble quarrying includes several very nice sketches relating to quarrying marble from the Century Magazine, September 1890.
  • “In The Marble Quarries of Vermont,” from Popular Mechanics, October 1914.
  • India – “Quarrying in India” in 1890 in “The Manufacturer and Builder,” Vol. 22, Issue 6, June 1890, pgs. 129-130.
  • Indian Diggings Marble Quarry Area and Indian Diggings Cemetery, El Dorado County, California - Visit to the Indian Diggings Cemetery and Indian Diggings Marble Quarry Area in the summer of 2003.
  • The Industrial Progress of The South” (circa 1880) (pdf), by J. B. Killebrew, in Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly, Vol. X, No. 6, December 1880, pp. 642-652.
“A Tennessee Marble Quarry," "Frank Leslie's Populat Monthly," Dec. 1880 Front page of “Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly” Magazine, 1880

“A Tennessee Marble Quarry” (1880)

Front page of “Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly” Magazine, 1880

 
"Cut in a Georgia Gold Mine," "Frank Leslie's Populat Monthly," Dec. 1880 “Mica Mine, Bakersville, North Carolina,” "Frank Leslie's Populat Monthly," Dec. 1880 “Stamping Mill in the Georgia Mine District," "Frank Leslie's Populat Monthly," Dec. 1880

“Cut in a Georgia Gold Mine”

“Mica Mine, Bakersville, North Carolina” (1880)

“Stamping Mill in the Georgia Mine District” (1880)

“South Carolina Phosphate Works - Mining Room, Phosphate Mill, Screen, and Crushing of Phosphate” (1880) “View of the Canal at Augusta, Ga.," "Frank Leslie's Populat Monthly," Dec. 1880 “Improvement of Charleston Harbor," "Frank Leslie's Populat Monthly," Dec. 1880

“South Carolina Phosphate Works - Mining Room, Phosphate Mill, Screen, and Crushing of Phosphate” (1880)

“View of the Canal at Augusta, Ga.” (1880)

“Improvement of Charleston Harbor” (1880)

“Ironworks in Tennessee," "Frank Leslie's Populat Monthly," Dec. 1880 “A Rice-Pounding Room," "Frank Leslie's Populat Monthly," Dec. 1880 “A Tobacco Sale at New Orleans," "Frank Leslie's Populat Monthly," Dec. 1880

“Ironworks in Tennessee” (1880)

“A Rice-Pounding Room” (1880)

“A Tobacco Sale at New Orleans” (1880)

  • Inyo Dolomite Quarries Photographic Tour  (These quarries are located in the eastern foothills of the Owens Valley near Lone Pine, Inyo County; and they were known as the Inyo Marble Company quarries in the late 1800s.)
View of Dolomite Quarry Area Meeting Hall in Dolomite Dolomite Quarry Monument

Banner from the December 12, 1891, issue of Scientific American Supplement, No. 832 “Fig 3 is a round hole drilled either by hand or otherwise, preferably otherwise, because an important point is to get it round. Fig. 4 is the improved form of hole, and this is made by inserting a reamer, Figs. 5 and 6, into the hole in the line of the proposed fracture, thus cutting two V-shaped grooves into the walls of the hole.” (from the December 12, 1891, issue of Scientific American Supplement) “The usual method of charging and tamping a hole in using the new system is shown in Fig. 8. The charge of powder is shown at C, the air space at B and the tamping at A. Fig. 9 is a special hole for use in thin beds of rock” (from the December 12, 1891, issue of Scientific American Supplement)

Banner from the December 12, 1891, issue of Scientific American Supplement, No. 832

“Fig 3 is a round hole drilled either by hand or otherwise, preferably otherwise, because an important point is to get it round.  Fig. 4 is the improved form of hole, and this is made by inserting a reamer, Figs. 5 and 6, into the hole in the line of the proposed fracture, thus cutting two V-shaped grooves into the walls of the hole.”  (from the December 12, 1891, issue of Scientific American Supplement)

“The usual method of charging and tamping a hole in using the new system is shown in Fig. 8.  The charge of powder is shown at C, the air space at B and the tamping at A.  Fig. 9 is a special hole for use in thin beds of rock” (from the December 12, 1891, issue of Scientific American Supplement)

The Limestone in the Quarry, Montour County, Pennsylvania.  (circa 1908) The Tunnel from Quarry and the Kilns, Montour County, Pennsylvania. (circa 1908) Drawing off the Liime from the Kilns, Montour County, Pennsylvania

The Limestone in the Quarry, Montour County, Pennsylvania

The Tunnel from Quarry and the Kilns, Montour County, Pennsylvania

Drawing off the Liime from the Kilns, Montour County, Pennsylvania

Next Page >>

[Top of Page]