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  • Maintenance of Interior Marble, by D. W. Kessler, Research Associate, Compliments of Carthage Marble Corporation Carthage, Missouri, Published by National Association of Marble Dealers, (no date of publication in the booklet – possibly early 1900s) 
    “Maintenance of Interior Marble” (front cover) by Carthage Marble Corp., Carthage, Missouri

    “Maintenance of Interior Marble” (front cover) by Carthage Marble Corp., Carthage, Missouri

  • Marble Color Plates: Imported and Domestic Catalog, Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, Vermont, no date of publication, probably mid-1900s.
    Vermont Marble Co. Marble Color Plates Imported and Domestic catalog title pg., no pub. date Vermont Marble Co. Marble Color Plates Imported and Domestic catalog list, no pub date

    Title Page of Catalog

    Alphabetical List of Color Plates of Marbles

  • Marble in India – “Marble in the Land of the Maharajahs:  The Taj Mahal, the Pearl Mosque and the Tomb of Ghiyas Beg contain some of the world’s finest examples of marble openwork, inlay and friezes,” Through the Ages, May 1923.
The Taj Majal in India, "Through the Ages" magazine, May 1923 Tomb of Itmad-ud-daulah, or Ghiyas Beg. A very perfect jewel of architecture. in India ("Through the Ages" magazine, May 1923) The Pearl Mosque in India ("Through the Ages" magazine, May 1923)

The Taj Majal in India, Through the Ages magazine, May 1923

“Tomb of Itmad-ud-daulah, or Ghiyas Beg. A very perfect jewel of architecture.” (in India)

The Pearl Mosque in India

  • “The Marble Mountains” (in Vermont), by Edwin B. Child, Scribener’s Magazine, May, 1905. This article is of the writer's visit to various marble quarries in Vermont and includes many drawings of that time of the quarry and the men working in the quarry.
  • Marble on the Edge,” by Gary McWilliams of Stone Arts of Alaska. This article is an Alaska/boat/stone/art story.  It is about Gary McWilliams’ journey of discovery
  • Marble Quarrying Industry in Vermont circa 1904 – “The Carrara of America,” by Day Allen Willey, in Scientific American, Vol. XCI, No. 10, November 5, 1904, pp. 309, 317-318.
“A Vermont Marble Quarry 200 feet Deep.” (circa 1904)

“A Vermont Marble Quarry 200 feet Deep.”

 
“Fifty-Ton Electric Crane Used for Loading Cars.” (circa 1904) “Channeling Machine at Work, Showing Vertical and Horizonal Cuts.” (circa 1904) “One of the Locomotive Cranes in Use at the American Carrara.” (circa 1904)

“Fifty-Ton Electric Crane Used for Loading Cars.”

“Channeling Machine at Work, Showing Vertical and Horizonal Cuts.”

“One of the Locomotive Cranes in Use at the American Carrara.”

“View of Quarry, Showing the Method of Supporting the Sides by Leaving Buttresses of Marble in the Cut.” (circa 1904) “Quarry at Proctor with Gang of Electric Channeling Machines.” (circa 1904) “Type of Steam Drill Used in Quarrying.” (circa 1904)

View of Quarry, Showing the Method of Supporting the Sides by Leaving Buttresses of Marble in the Cut.

“Quarry at Proctor with Gang of Electric Channeling Machines.”

“Type of Steam Drill Used in Quarrying.”

  • The Marble-Workers’ Manual. Designed for the Use of Marble-Workers, Builders, and Owners of Houses. Containing practical information respecting marbles in general; their cutting, working, and polishing; veneering of marble; painting upon and coloring of marble; mosaics; composition and use of artificial marble, stuccos, cements, receipts, secrets, etc., etc. (1856) Translated from the French, By M. L. Booth, with an Appendix Concerning American Marbles. Sheldon, Blakeman & Co., New-York, 1856. (The entire book is presented including picture of workmen's tools.)
    • A 1857 book review of the above book, is available at: Manual of Marble and Marble Working – Book Review, in Putnam’s Monthly Magazine of American Literature, Science and Art, January 1857) is available at the link in the beginning of this sentence.
  • Marble and Marble Working: A Handbook for Architects, Sculptors, Marble Quarry Owners and Workers, and All Engaged in the Building and Decorative Industries, by W. G. Renwick, Author of The Marble Industry, The Working of Marble for Decorative Purposes, etc. New York: D. Van Nostrand Company; London: Crosby Lockwood and Son, 1909. (This book is now available on Google Book Search in the Full View Books section. You can view the book as it was originally printed on the web site, and you can download the book in PDF format to your computer.)
  • Marble Sample Box by the Vermont Marble Company (The below images of the marble samples, the box (below), and accompanying literature are available for viewing using the link at the beginning of this entry.) The box was produced by the Vermont Marble Company of Proctor, Vermont. The Vermont Marble Company was one of the largest and oldest suppliers of cemetery stones across the United States.
    Lid of box of marble samples of the Vermont Marble Co., Proctor, VT Box of marble samples by the Vermont Marble Co., Proctor, VT
       
  • McGilvray Granite Quarry, Knowles, Madera County, California - Photographic Tour of Quarry September 10, 2010.
Quarry Face of McGilvray Quarry Granite Grout Piles near quarry Ruins of residence at the quarry
     
  • Medium Quincy Granite Monuments Catalog, Gray Rock Granite Company, Successors to Elkhill & Bishop (E&B), 127 Centre Street, Quincy, Massachusetts (no date of publication available – probably early 1900s)
Front cover of the “Medium Quincy Granite Monuments” catalog, Gray Rock Granite Co., successors to Elkhill & Bishop), circa early 1900s Photograph of the Reeves cemetery monument in the “Medium Quincy Granite Monuments” catalog (ca. early 1900s) Photograph of the McKay cemetery monument in the “Medium Quincy Granite Monuments” catalog (ca. early 1900s)

Front cover of the “Medium Quincy Granite Monuments” catalog, Gray Rock Granite Co., successors to Elkhill & Bishop), circa early 1900s

Photograph of the Reeves cemetery monument in the “Medium Quincy Granite Monuments” catalog

Photograph of the McKay cemetery monument in the “Medium Quincy Granite Monuments” catalog

  • Memorial Stone, by Oliver Bowles, Bureau of Mines Information Circular 7720, Department of the Interior, June 1955, 6 pp. (The excerpt below is from the “Introduction.”)

    “From the most remote periods of civilization stone has been used to perpetuate the memory of individuals or to immortalize their noble achievements. Ancient memorials ranged from simple piles of stone (cairns), or single markers, to great obelisks and pyramids or magnificent mausoleums. The Taj Mahal at Agra, India, built of white marble by Shah Jehan in memory of the Empress Mumtez Mahal, is one of the most beautiful and costly memorials ever built. It was erected between 1632 and 1650 at an estimated cost of $50,000,000 or more and is today an object of unusual interest for travelers. Other magnificent memorials both ancient and modern are to be found in many lands....”

  • Memorializing the Civil War Dead:  Modernity and Corruption under the Grant Administration,” by Bruce S. Elliott, in Markers XXVI, Association for Gravestone Studies, 2011, pp. 15-55.  (Reprinted with permission of the Association for Gravestone Studies.) 

    This article describes the need to mass produce the Civil War headstones rather than by individual stone carvers. Contracts for the headstones and bases were given out to several different quarries and companies in Vermont, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Kansas, and Tennessee. The need for large numbers of markers also increased the use of the sandblasting process to speed up carving the names on the stones. Both mass production the sandblasting process caused great changes in the work of the stone carvers, which led to demands by the stone workers’ unions, such as the eight-hour work day.

  • Mexican Onyx/Marble & Arizona Onyx in 1892: “Arizona Onyx,” “The Mexican Onyx Quarries,” & “Mexican Marble,” in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, October 1892.
  • Mineral Resources of the Appalachian Region – A compilation of information on the mineral resources, mineral industry, and geology of the Appalachian Region, Geological Survey Professional Paper 580, U. S. Geological Survey and the U. S. Bureau of Mines, United States Government Printing Office, Washington, 1968.
  • Mineral Resources of the United States in the U. S. Geological Survey annual reports and mineral resources books from 1883 through 1931.
    Included for these years are the sections on the “Stone” (including granite, marble, limestone, and slate), “Cement,” and portions of the “Abrasive Materials” of the Mineral Resources sections of the U. S. Geological Survey books from 1883 through 1931.  (For 1932 and later years, see “Mineral Yearbooks of the U. S. Bureau of Mines (1932 through 1993) - Metals, Nonmetals, and Fuels - Domestic & International” below.) Title Page
  • Mineral Yearbooks of the U. S. Bureau of Mines (1932 through 1993) - Metals, Nonmetals, and Fuels - Domestic & International
  • Minnesota –The Granites of Minnesota,” The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 17, Issue No. 10, October 1885, pp. 226.
    • Minnesota – “The Kasota Quarries” (dolomites and dolomitic stones of southeastern Minnesota), in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 18, Issue 6, June 1886.
      “Tabular comparison of the qualities of the various stones used in St. Paul, Minneapolis, and other points in the northwest in which Kasota stone figures” (1886)

      “Tabular comparison of the qualities of the various stones used in St. Paul, Minneapolis, and other points in the northwest in which Kasota stone figures” (1886)

  • Mission San Antonio de Pala, San Diego County, California – the San Antonio de Pala Asistencia – Uses of Local Stone (the mission is known as Mission San Antonio de Pala). The Pala Mission was originally a branch of San Luis Rey de Francia Mission, located east of Oceanside.  See the “San Antonio de Pala Asistencia” photo tour on our web site. (The following photographs taken in May 2012 by Peggy B. Perazzo)
Bell Tower at the Pala Mission with stone base, San Diego Co., CA Stone-edged walkway, and what appears to be a stone planter, Pala Mission, San Diego Co., CA Portion of the Mission San Antonio de Pala enclosed garde, San Diego Co., CA

Bell Tower at the Pala Mission with stone base

Stone-edged walkway, and what appears to be a stone planter

Portion of the Mission San Antonio de Pala enclosed garden

Front cover of "The Missions of California," by E.L. Smyth, 1899 "Mission Garden at Santa Barbara," from "The Missions of California," by E.L. Smyth, 1899 "Mission San Gabriel Stairs," from "The Missions of California," by E.L. Smyth, 1899

Front cover of The Missions of California,” published in 1899

“Mission Garden at Santa Barbara” (1899)

“Mission San Gabriel Stairs”
(1899)

  • Modern Memorial Art Catalog, Some Examples Cut in Stony Creek, Milford Pink and Victoria White Granites, The Dodds Granite Company, Main Office:  Milford, Massachusetts, Quarries & Plants:  Milford, Massachusetts; Stony Creek, Connecticut; Keene, New Hampshire, New York City Office.
    "Modern Memorial Art" monumental catalog, Dodds Granite Co., MA, Conn., NY, NY
     
  • Modern Memorials in Marble,  Illustrating designs for various monumental purposes with numerous examples of the use of marble in both ancient and modern times, Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, Vermont, designed, engraved, and printed in Bartlett Orr Press, New York, 1922.  (Includes price list for this 1922 monument catalog/book) 
  • Front cover of Modern Memorials in Marble, Vermont Marble Company, 1922 Campo Santo at Genoa, Italy – one of the largest and finest cemeteries in Italy, pp. 34 in Modern Memorials in Marble, Vermont Marble Co., 1922 The Hote Memorial, pp. 65 of Modern Memorials in Marble, Vermont Marble Co., 1922

    Front cover of Modern Memorials in Marble, Vermont Marble Company, 1922

    Campo Santo at Genoa, Italy – one of the largest and finest cemeteries in Italy, pp. 34 in Modern Memorials in Marble, Vermont Marble Co., 1922

    The Hote Memorial, pp. 65 of Modern Memorials in Marble, Vermont Marble Co., 1922

  • Montgomery Ward & Co. Monuments, Tombstones and Markers Catalog, 1929 (pp. 4-21 presents available monuments, choices of stone available, and prices; pp. 22 “Fraternal or Military Emblems”; pp. 23 “Information About Lettering”; pp. 24 “Verses Suitable for Inscriptions”; pp. 25 “Sturdy Iron Furniture and Fencing”; pp. 26 “Suggestions for Setting Monuments” (with diagrams); inside back cover: ordering information including freight charges shipped from Rutland, Vermont; Elmwood, Illinois; and Portland, Oregon.)
  • The Monument and Cemetery Review: The Exponent of Art in the Monument Field, October, 1926. (The image below contains the “Contents” section of the October 1926 issue. Click on the link in magazine title in the preceding sentence to view the entire issue in PDF. Peggy B. Perazzo.)
    The Monument and Cemetery Review, October 1926

    The Monument and Cemetery Review, October 1926

  • Monument Trade Builder, March-April, 1918, published by Barclay Brothers, Barre, Vermont  (monument construction and production)
“Front cover of the March-April 1918 issue of "Monument Trade Builder," published by Barclay Brothers of Barre, Vermont.” “View on the bank at the Barclay quarries, showing a nice pattern being loaded.” (1918) “Main Battery of Surfacing Machines.” Barclay Brothers, Barre, Vermont (1918)

“Front cover of the March-April 1918 issue of "Monument Trade Builder," published by Barclay Brothers of Barre, Vermont.”

“View on the bank at the Barclay quarries, showing a nice pattern being loaded.”

“Main Battery of Surfacing Machines.” Barclay Brothers, Barre, Vermont

Front cover of Monuments..For The Ages, Miller Monuments, Indiana “Symbols and Their Meaning” section of Monuments..For The Ages, Miller Monuments, Indiana One of the pages from Monuments.. For The Ages, Miller Monuments, Indiana

Front cover of Monuments..For The Ages

“Symbols and Their Meaning” section of Monuments..For The Ages

One of the pages from Monuments.. For The Ages

Standard Portland Cement Company, general view of plant from southeast. Photo of Standard Portland Cement Company / Corporation Ruins Basalt Rock Co. Rotunda Building
  • New England Granite Quarry Channeling a New England Granite Quarry (postcard photograph 11719; “Phostint” Card; made only by Detroit Publishing Co.; unmailed, ca 1908)
  • The New England Granite Works Catalog – Established in 1845, Chartered 1877  (no date of publication shown)  489 Fifth Avenue, New York City, New York; General Office, Westerly, Rhode Island; Quarries and Works:  Westerly, Rhode Island, and Concord, New Hampshire.
    "New England Granite Works" monument catalog, New York; Westerly, RI; Concord, NH
     
  • New York – A Large Paving Stone” (Quarried in at Barreville, New York, for the residence of, Mr. W. H. Vanderbilt on Fifth Avenue, New York), in Scientific American, Vol. XLV, No. 10, New York, September 3, 1881.

  • New York – “Bluestone Sidewalks” (Bluestone quarried in the state of New York), Scientific American, Vol. LXIII, No. 21, New York, November 22, 1890.
  • Norwegian Granite Industry,” in Stone, An Illustrated Magazine, July 1917.
  • The Ohio Freestone District,” in Stone, An Illustrated Magazine, July 1892.
  • Our Building Stone Supply” circa 1887, (Quarrying in the United States circa 1887), by George P. Merrill, Scientific American Supplement, No. 577, January 22, 1887, & “Our Building Stone Supply” Conclusion, Scientific American Supplement, No. 578, January 29, 1887. Also available is the similar, but earlier and shorter version of this article:  “Our Building Stone Supply,” Scientific American,  January 8, 1887.
    Interior view of marble quarry, West Rutland, Vermont Portland Sandstone Quarries – Splitting out the stone with wedges (Connecticut)

    Interior view of marble quarry, West Rutland, Vermont

    Portland Sandstone Quarries – Splitting out the stone with wedges (Connecticut)

    Quarries of Flynt Granite Co., Monson, Massachusetts Granite Quarries, Hallowell, Maine

    Quarries of Flynt Granite Co., Monson, Massachusetts

    Granite Quarries, Hallowell, Maine

  • Pakistan - the Ziarat Marble Quarry, Pakistan - “Pakistan Marble Helps Taliban Stay in Business,” by Pir Zubair Shah and Jane Perlez, New York Times online edition, International/Asia Pacific, July 14, 2008.

    “The takeover of the Ziarat quarry has enabled the Taliban to turn themselves into a self-sustaining fighting force.”

    According to this article, in April of 2008 the Taliban settled a feud between two local tribes and took over control of the Ziarat marble quarry located on a “mountain of white marble” between the city of Peshawar and the Afghan border. The marble, considered a national asset, is used mainly for “expensive floors and Walls in Pakistan, and in limited quantities abroad” and is considered comparable to the Italian Carrara marble. Prior to the Taliban takeover, the quarry had been inactive for about four years. The marble is quarried using dynamite, which shatters much of the stone; and old trucks are used to transport the marble to nearby towns for manufacturing. The Taliban charges a fee and a tax upon each truck of marble.

    Photo caption: “Each truck of marble that rolls out of the Ziarat quarry in Pakistan means a payment to the Taliban, which holds power in the area.” (A map of the area is also included.)

  • Pennsylvania Slate
  • Penryn, Placer County, California, Granite Quarry Trip - The Griffith Quarry in Penryn (1997 & 2000)
  • Penryn, Placer County, Griffth Penryn Quarry Photographic Tour (October 2010)
  • The Penrhyn Slate Quarry,” (at Dolawen in Caernarvonshire, Wales, England), in Saturday Magazine, No. 12, September 8th, 1832, pp. 93

    Other articles included in this magazine are:  * “Crosby Hall,”  * “Memoir of Doctor Samuel Johnson,”  * “Who Is Alone?” (a poem),  * “Vegetable Titan (Rafflesia Arnoldi, or Krûbul),”  * “The Puma (Felis Concolar),”  * “A Visit To A Salt Mine” (at Ischl), * “All For The Best,”  * “Abbreviations and Signs,”  * “Boscobel Cottage” (“near the town of Madeley, on the confines of Worcestershire and Shropshire.”)

    “Penrhyn Slate Quarry” at Dolawen, in Caernarvonshire, England, 1832 Penrhyn Slate Quarry at Dolawen, in Caernarvonshire, England, 1832

    “Penrhyn Slate Quarry”
    at Dolawen, in Caernarvonshire, England, 1832

    Penrhyn Slate Quarry

  • The Penrhyn Slate Quarries in North Wales circa 1858, in The Illustrated London News, Vol. XXXII, No. 913, Saturday, April 17, 1858, pp. 392-393.
    In the Penrhyn Quarry, in "The Illustrated London News," April 17, 1858. The Penrhyn Slate Quarry in North Wales, , in "The Illustrated London News," April 17, 1858.

    In the Penrhyn Quarry circa 1858

    The Penrhyn Slate Quarry in North Wales circa 1958

    Quarryman at work in one of the Penrhyn slate quarries, , in "The Illustrated London News," April 17, 1858. The Fitzroy Slate Quarry in North Wale, , in "The Illustrated London News," April 17, 1858.

    Quarryman at work in one of the Penrhyn slate quarries circa 1858

    The Fitzroy Slate Quarry in North Wales circa 1858

  • Portland Cement:  Its Constitution, Properties, and Manufacture – Regions Where the Different Materials Are Found,” by Richard K. Meade, Mines and Minerals, June 1902.

  • The Potsdam Red Sandstone Quarries,” Scientific American, Vol. LXVIII, No. 1, January 7, 1893, pp. 1, 8-10. (The second part of this article on the Potsdam Red Sandstone quarries follows this article.)

Bird’s Eye View of the Potsdam Red Sandstone Quarry No. 1 (New York, 1893) Potsdam Red Sandstone Quarry No. 1 (New York, 1893) Potsdam Red Sandstone Quarry No. 2 Under Development (New York, 1893)

Bird’s Eye View of the Potsdam Red Sandstone Quarry No. 1

Potsdam Red Sandstone
Quarry No. 1

Potsdam Red Sandstone Quarry
No. 2 under development

Potsdam Red Sandstone Quarry No. 3 under development (Dark Red) (New York, 1893) Potsdam Red Sandstone Quarry No. 4 (New York, 1893) Selecting large blocks of dimension stone (Potsdam, New York, 1893)

Potsdam Red Sandstone Quarry
No. 3 under development
(Dark Red)

Potsdam Red Sandstone
Quarry No. 4

Selecting large blocks of
dimension stone

Stone Cutting Shop  (Potsdam, New York, 1893) Parliament Buildings, Ottawa, built of Potsdam Red Sandstone (1893) Columbia College, New York (1893)

Stone Cutting Shop

Parliament Buildings, Ottawa, built of Potsdam Red Sandstone

Columbia College, New York

Title page of the Producers' Marble Co. Catalogs of 1886, '87, and '89 (Vermont) One of the cemetery stones in the Producers’ Marble Co. Catalogs of 1886, ’87, and ’89 (Vermont) Cemetery stone in the Producers' Marble Co. Catalogs of 1886, '87, and '89 (Vermont)

Title page of the Producers’ Marble Co. Catalogs of 1886, ’87, and ’89 (Vermont)

One of the cemetery stones in the Producers’ Marble Co. Catalogs of 1886, ’87, and ’89 (Vermont)

One of the cemetery stones in the Producers’ Marble Co. Catalogs of 1886, ’87, and ’89 (Vermont)

Entrance to Raymond Museum Raymond Lower Quarry Raymond Upper Quarry
     
View of the front of Mission Basilica San Diego de Alcala, San Diego, CA Bell Tower at San Diego Mission, San Diego Mission Garden, San Diego, CA Grindstone in the San Diego Mission Garden, San Diego, CA

View of the front of Mission Basilica San Diego de Alcalá

View of the San Diego Mission Bell Tower/Campanario from one of the mission gardens

Grindstone in the San Diego Mission Garden

Santa Cruz Portland Cement Plant (Cemex), Davenport, Santa Cruz County, CA Santa Cruz Portland Cement Plant (Cemex), Davenport, Santa Cruz County, CA Santa Cruz Portland Cement Plant (Cemex), Davenport, Santa Cruz County, CA

 

Santa Cruz Portland Cement Plant & Quarry (Cemex), Davenport, Santa Cruz County, CA

 

  • Scotland – “The Disaster at The Crarae Quarries,” in Scientific American Supplement, Vol. XXII, No. 569, November 27, 1886, pp. 9079.
    Picture of the quarry from "Disaster at The Crarae Quarries," Scotland, 1886 Picture from "Disaster at The Crarae Quarries," Scotland, 1886

    1.  The quarry, looking from the lake.  2.  Interior of the quarry.  (originally published in the London Graphic)

    1.  Crarae Quarry from the Loch.  2.  Passengers watching the blast from the Lord of Isles.  3.  Quarrymen bringing out the bodies.  4.  The rush from the quarry.  (originally published in The Illustrated London News)

  • Scotland – “The Rubislaw Granite Quarry, Aberdeenshire, from a sketch by S. Read,” in The Illustrated London News, April 20, 1862, pp. 410.
    “The Rubislaw Granite Quarry, Aberdeenshire, (Scotland) from a sketch by S. Read,” in The Illustrated London News, April 20, 1862
     
  • Secrets of the Parthenon, presented by NOVA and available on DVD. Sections on “Links & Books” and a “Teacher’s Guide” are included in addition to the following subjects:
  • Sixteenth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey. Part IV. - Mineral Resources of the United States, 1894, Nonmetallic Products - “Stone” by William C. Day. (The report on stone for 1894 treated in some detail of the nature, composition, and properties of the different kinds of commercially important stone; also of uses to which they are put, the modes of occurrence in nature, methods of quarrying, dressing, and finishing for their various uses, etc.)
  • Slate Quarrying and Manufacture in America(and Vermont) circa 1872, in Scientific American, Vol. XXVII, No. 11, New York, September 14, 1872, pp. 160-161.
    Banner for Sept. 14, 1872, edition of Scientific American

    Banner for Sept. 14, 1872, edition of Scientific American in which the above article appeared

  • Soledad Mission, Monterey County, California – Mission Nuestra Senora de la Soledad – Uses of Local Stone (the mission, cemetery, and deteriorating adobe walls and stone foundations) (The following photographs taken in June 2012 by Peggy B. Perazzo)
Front of Soledad Mission, Monterey County, CA Display of native American Indian stone implements, Mission Soledad, Monterey County, CA Deteriorating adobe walls & remnants of the stone foundations of the Indian workshops at Mission Soledad, Monterey County, CA

Front of Soledad Mission

Display of native American Indian stone implements

Deteriorating adobe walls & remnants of the stone foundations of the Indian workshops at
Mission Soledad

  • “Some Women Marble Cutters” (circa 1880s) The article in the image is from The Monumental News Magazine, the date of the original publication is unknown, although it was published some years after 1885, pp. 120 (?). This article was included as one of the past articles of the magazine in the December, 1939 issue of The Monumental News Magazine. (Photo captions: Lucy J. Daniel, of Executor, Mo.; Alice E. Rigg, of Canada; & Pearl Sams, of Great Bend, Kansas.)

    “Some Women Marble Cutters” (circa 1880s)

  • Sources of Memorial Ornamentation (PDF), by Henry Powell Hopkins, A.M., B.Arch., A.I.A., Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, Vermont, printed by the Barta Press, Cambridge, Mass., 1924, 44 pp. (From the Forward: “This brief outline of ornamentation as related to memorial design has been written under the encouragement of Capt. E.R. Morse of the Vermont Marble Company and in the belief that there is need for a simple and practical presentation on the subject. It is mainly for the memorial craftsman and his salesmen that this work is produced and it is the writer’s desire to make some contribution…to a better knowledge of memorial ornamentation in the retail selling field. Correct ornament invariably has an historic derivation which can be traced and which gains meaning if its origin and the structural or artistic reasons for its use are understood.”)
Front cover of "Sources of Memorial Ornamentation," Vermont Marble Co., Proctor, Vt pp. 3 of the Forward of Front cover of "Sources of Memorial Ornamentation," Vermont Marble Co., Proctor, Vt pp. 4 of the Forward of Front cover of "Sources of Memorial Ornamentation," Vermont Marble Co., Proctor, Vt

Front cover of "Sources of Memorial Ornamentation,"
Vermont Marble Co.

pp. 3 of the Forward of
Front cover of "Sources of Memorial Ornamentation,"
Vermont Marble Co.

pp. 4 of the Forward of
Front cover of "Sources of Memorial Ornamentation,"
Vermont Marble Co.

Photo of Stone Mountain, Georgia (1920s) Photo of the Central Group of the Stone Mountain Memorial and aerial view of the finishing plants and quarries at Stone Mountain (1920s) Samples of memorials constructed from Stone Mountain Granite (1920s)

Stone Mountain, Georgia

Photo of the Central Group of the Stone Mountain Memorial and aerial view of the finishing plants and quarries at Stone Mountain

Examples of memorials constructed from Stone Mountain Granite

  • Stone Quarry Industry French & Italian Trade Cards (circa 1903) Below are four of the trade cards included in a group of cards that I recently acquired. Peggy B. Perazzo
    Italian Trade Card (ca. 1903) French Trade Card - Basque (ca. 1903)

    Italian Trade Card
    Transporting Marble in Italy

    French Trade Card – Basque
    Stone Quarry Workers

    French Trade Card – Early Marble Sculptures in Italy (ca. 1903) French Sandstone Quarry Trade Card (ca. 1903)

    French Trade Card – Early Marble Sculptures in Italy

    French Sandstone Quarry Trade Card

  • Stories in Stone, by David B. Williams, in PDF format. You can learn more about David B. Williams’ interest in stone on his web site: David B. Williams: GeologyWriter. (His new book is now available: Stories in Stone: Travels Through Urban Geology. He also has a blog relating to geology that you might want to visit: Stories in Stone: The interfingering between people and rock.)
  • The Story of a Monument, presented by Dakota Granite, South Dakota. The story of a monument begins with the story of Dakota Mahogany granite.
  • Structural Materials in Parts of Oregon and Washingtion, 1909 by N. H. Darton.
  • Studies in Granite: The Noblest of Building Stone, No. 2 of the Granite Series, 1923-1924-1925, National Building Granite Quarris Assn., Inc., Boston, Mass.
    "Studies in Granite," 1923-1925 "Studies in Granite," 1923-1925
       
  • Sullivan Machinery Company - “The Great Beginnings of a Great New Hampshire Industry,” by George B. Upham in The Granite Monthly magazine, Vol. 53, No. 4, April 1921. [PDF]
    “The Sullivan Machinery Company now has offices in Boston, New York, Pittsburgh, Knoxville, St. Louis, Cleveland, Duluth, Dallas, Joplin, Denver, Spokane, El Paso, Salt Lake, Toronto, Vancouver, Mexico City, Santiago in Chile, and Lima in Peru. In the old world it maintains headquarters at London and Paris and before the war had a flourishing branch in Petrograd. A branch has been maintained for many years in Sydney, Australia, and the company’s representatives are selling Sullivan mining machinery in Japan, India, the Federated Malay States, and South Africa.

    “Sullivan machinery for excavating rock in mines, tunnels and quarries, for compressing air, for prospecting for minerals, and for mining coal is found in every part of the world where these industries are carried on. This article tells of the small, yet interesting beginnings of this New Hampshire Industry.”

    (The names used for this company include: “D. A. Clay & Co.,” “Claremont Machine Works,” “J. P. Upham & Co.,” and lastly, the “Sullivan Machinery Company.”)

  • Sullivan Machinery Company (undated booklet) From the booklet: “Sullivan Machinery company links with the past through a merger in 1946 when Sullivan was acquired by Joy Manufacturing Company…The mutually beneficial merger remained in force until early in 1984 when Joy Manufacturing Company chose to relinquish its markets and products for heavy construction and metallic mining in favor of concentrating the company’s efforts in the prime markets of non-metallic mining and other energy related industries….”
    Sullivan Machinery Company: The First 95 Years & Sullivan Machinery Company: The Second Century, by the Sullivan Machinery Company (published after 1984) Sullivan Machinery Company: The First 95 Years & Sullivan Machinery Company: The Second Century, by the Sullivan Machinery Company (published after 1984)
  • Sweetwater Dam, San Diego County – the Sweetwater Dam & Quarry  (The following photographs and the photographs in the “Sweetwater Dam & Quarry Photographic Tour” section of our web site were taken in late May 2012.  This is one of the stops on the San Diego County granite quarry tour that Jeff McGreevy took my husband Pat and me on that covered the Santee/Lakeside/Grossmont, et al. areas. Peggy B. Perazzo)
Sweetwater Dam & granite quarry, San Diego Co., CA (5/2012) Sweetwater Dam & granite quarry, San Diego Co., CA (5/2012) Sweetwater Dam & granite quarry, San Diego Co., CA (5/2012)

 

Sweetwater Dam & Granite Quarry

 

Front cover of "Symbols of Service," one of the monumental catalogs by the Vermont Marble Co., Proctor, Vermont Front side of the 1776 cemetery stone belonging to Lt. Col. Joseph Wait, and officer in the American Revolutionary War ("Symbols of Service," Vermont Marble Co., 1919) “Grouped on this page are some of the more important emblems of the American Army.” ("Symbols of Service," Vermont Marble Co., 1919)

Front cover of Symbols of Service, one of the monumental catalogs by the Vermont Marble Co.,
Prctor, Vermont

1776 cemetery stone belonging to Lt. Col. Joseph Wait, Revolutionary War soldier

“Grouped on this page are some of the more important emblems of the American Army.” (Symbols of Service, pp. 36)

Tolenas Springs Onyx/"Marble"/Travertine quarry & Mineral Springs area near Fairfield, Solano County, CA Rock at the Tolenas Springs quarry & mineral springs area, near Fairfield, Solano County, CA Rock at the Tolenas Springs quarry & mineral springs area, near Fairfield, Solano County, CA

Tolenas Springs onyx/“marble”/travertine quarry & mineral springs area

Close-up of a rock at the Tolenas Springs onyx/“marble”/travertine quarry area

Another rock at the Tolenas Springs quarry area

Front cover of "Tombstones and Monuments:  Catalog of Memorial Art in Granite and Marble," Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, Illinois, First Edition, circa 1906 Title page of “Tombstones and Monuments,” Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, Illinois, First Edition, circa 1906 The “Grave Lot Enclosures” section of “Tombstones and Monuments,” Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, Illinois, First Edition, circa 1906

Front cover of “Tombstones and Monuments: Catalog of Memorial Art in Granite and Marble,” Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, Illinois, First Edition, circa 1906

Title page of “Tombstones and Monuments,” Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, Illinois, First Edition, circa 1906

The “Grave Lot Enclosures” section of “Tombstones and Monuments,” Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, Illinois, First Edition, circa 1906

Monument in “Tombstones and Monuments,” Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, Illinois, First Edition, circa 1906 Monument in “Tombstones and Monuments,” Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, Illinois, First Edition, circa 1906 Monument in “Tombstones and Monuments,” Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, Illinois, First Edition, circa 1906

 

Three of the monuments in “Tombstones and Monuments,” Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, Illinois, First Edition, circa 1906

 

Pirie Granite Quarry, Williamstown, Vermont; Offices in Barre, VT Overhead crane at Pirie Quarry # 1 Yard, Williamstown, VT Fully-loaded flatcar parked near its future competitor – a late-1920s/early-1930s truck, Williamstown, VT

Pirie Granite Quarry, Williamstown, Vermont; Offices in Barre, Vermont

Overhead crane at Pirie Quarry # 1 Yard

A fully-loaded flatcar parked near its future competitor – a late-1920s/early-1930s truck

Old Vermont Marble Headstones, 1940 Pillars Memorial, Garden of Memory, Fostoria, Ohio, 1940 Vermont Marble Company’s Stone Yard, Proctor, Vermont, 1940

Old Vermont Marble Headstones

Pillars Memorial, Garden of Memory, Fostoria, Ohio

Vermont Marble Company’s Stone Yard, Proctor, Vermont

  • Virginia – “Soapstone Quarries of Virginia,” Scientific American, New York, June 6, 1896.
  • W. A. Hambleton Granite Monuments & Statuary Catalog – At Wholesale, Book No. 10, American & Foreign, Mansfield, Ohio; Barre, Vermont; Aberdeen, Scotland
    W. A. Hambleton Granite Monuments & Statuary At Wholesale Catalog, Book No. 10, Mansfield, OH
     
  • Washington Monument Memorial Stones (Album/Slide Show), presented on the Washington Monument web site by National Park Service.
    • Washington Monument - Experience the Monument - the Memorial Stones

      The Washington Monument web site has been redesigned. Below is an description that was available on the National Park Service web site in January 2008 that describes the Memorial Stones in the Washington Monument at the following web address. This web address is no longer available.
      <http://www.nps.gov/wamo/experience/memstones/State%20Stones/memstone.htm>

      “A unique feature of the Washington Monument is the 193 memorial stones that adorn the interior of the monument. Starting in July 1848 the Washington National Monument Society invited states, cities and patriotic societies to contribute Memorial Stones. The Society listed some requirements to be followed. They asked that the stone be durable, a product of the state’s soil, and meet the following dimensions; four feet long, two feet high and 18 inches thick. These stones pay tribute to the character and achievements of George Washington. These traits are not only admired by Americans but by people the world over as seen by the number of stones donated by foreign countries. Below is a list of stones donated by state. In the near future all the stones will be online.

      “While viewing the stones please keep in mind that the Washington Monument has undergone extensive renovation over the last three years. A key component of the project has been the restoration of the memorial stones. Over the years the stones have been damaged by moisture and vandalism. The pictures that follow show the condition of the stones before their restoration. In the upcoming months new images will be added highlighting the restored stones.”

  • Whetstones in the United States,” Stone, An Illustrated Magazine, November 1892.
  • The Wisconsin Sandstones,” The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 17, Issue 12, December 1885.
  • The World’s Largest Derrick” (located at the C.E. Tayntor quarry in Graniteville, Vermont), by Andreas Kuehnpast.  This article was originally published in The Barre-Montpelier Times Argus on August 4, 2014.  It is used here with permission.  (Andreas Kuehnpast is an industrial engineer from Germany.  In his spare time he researches the Barre granite industry and the railroad that served it, the Barre & Chelsea Railroad.)

    This circa 1895 photo of the C.E. Tayntor quarry shows the largest derrick in the world in the center. (Photo from the collection of Todd Paton. Used with permission.)

    This circa 1895 photo of the C.E. Tayntor quarry shows the largest derrick in the world in the center.  (Photo from the collection of Todd Paton. Used with permission.)

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